Delta's Medallion Program

Seeing as I'm starting to learn my way around Delta's elite program, called Medallion, I thought we could look through everything together and see what to expect flying with Delta.



Delta's program features 4 status levels, and this is very much like what American is moving to, with one exception. Delta's highest tier, Diamond Medallion, is one of the highest levels in the business. By that I mean that the required flown miles is much higher for Delta than other airlines. Medallion status levels break down like this.

Delta's MQM Chart

Delta's MQM Chart

As you can see from the chart; Silver, Gold and Platinum pair closely to Gold, Platinum and Platinum Pro on the American side, however there is a big jump to Diamond. This makes it harder to achieve, but the perks are certainly still worth it. Diamond comes with the 4 World Upgrades. The high mark though will probably mean I need to wait until next year to grab it.

For this year, I'm going to status match to Gold, since that is the equivalent to my current Platinum status with American. Ideally if I can make it happen, I'd prefer to push to Platinum on Delta's side for the additional perks that come at that status level. This delay's my push to highest tier status for this year, but changing loyalties does cause delays sometimes.

One of the big items on the above list is the Medallion Qualifying Dollars for Diamond status. No one wants to have to spend $15,000 on flights to reach the max status. Luckily their is a work around. Spend $25,000 on your credit card and you can bypass this requirement. This is a nice addition because while $25,000 is a lot of money, if you are spending on a card anyways, this can not only bypass the requirement, but at $30,000 on the Delta Reserve card, you get 15,000 Medallion Qualifying Miles added to your account. In turn this means that you get to bypass the spending requirement and reduce the mileage required to qualify, down to 110,000 miles. If you are a prolific spender, at $60,000 on the credit card you are able to get an additional 15,000 MQM. Grab other Delta cards and spend more money and more MQM's come your way. Personally $60,000 is too much to handle, and would likely be better spent on other cards with better rewards.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Delta's Medallion program is deep and has many perks and different levels of those perks depending on your status. Check out the Delta Medallion webpage for the full breakdown, but it's on par with American in many cases, and beats it out in a few categories... hence my move to Delta.

Rocket Scientist, Travel Junkie, and Ruler of the 4th Moon of Omicron Persei 8